NZ's first major craft research project

Craft Aotearoa is excited to launch New Zealand's first major craft research project that aims to identify how the wider public engages in craft as well as profiling the craft sector itself.

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Craft Aotearoa is excited to launch New Zealand's first major craft research project that aims to identify how the wider public engages in craft as well as profiling the craft sector itself.

Craft Aotearoa intends to publish a report that profiles New Zealand craft and how the public engages in craft, fulfilling one of our key charitable objectives:

        (f) To undertake research into the craft sector and its profile in New Zealand and make the
        results available to inform business planning, education programmes and employment services;

The report will subsequently be made available to the public. To inform this report, we are seeking a broad range of views from members of the public who are interested in craft, craft practitioners, craft industry groups and organisations, online craft communities, craft galleries and retailers, craft researchers and publications, curators, and teachers and students engaged in craft practice.

Survey details
The consultation is open from 18 June - 19 August and is in three parts:

Part One - seeking the views of the wider public and those engaged in craft.
Part Two - developing a profile of those that design and make craft in New Zealand.
Part Three - craftsmanship skills and qualifications.

There are 25 questions (though not all may apply) including sub-questions for students and graduates, and  residents of Christchurch and Canterbury following the spate of recent earthquakes. 

What happens when the consultation ends?
Craft Aotearoa is in the process of founding a national reference group to inform and support the development of a report that contextualises the research results. This group will comprise representatives from a range of craft disciplines across New Zealand, to ensure a national overview and is a model of collaboration that has been successful internationally. For example, in 2008-2009 it was used in the development of The Craft Blueprint: a workforce development plan for craft in the UK.

It is anticipated that the final report will provide a platform for future projects that ultimately ensures the public has greater access to a broad range of craft activities throughout New Zealand.

What are the key outcomes resulting from this research project?

  • members of the public have an opportunity to share their thoughts on craft in New Zealand
  • statistical evidence is gathered 
  • a national craft database will be developed and managed by Craft Aotearoa
  • leadership across the New Zealand craft sector is strengthened
  • relationships are strengthened within the craft sector
  • increasing awareness of craft strengths and weaknesses at the present time
  • increasing awareness of how to engage the public in craft sector
  • a current profile of the New Zealand craft sector and how the public engage in craft is developed

What are the constraints of the research project?
Due to lack of funding the research will not seek to include any individual face to face or phone interviews, and only four public consultation meetings will be held to support the project in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin.

We have met with Statistics New Zealand who advise that as the data set for craft industries is too marginal to be of a good quality, it will not be possible to reference any government statistics pertaining to craft. (We think this makes this research project even more valuable.)

Further information: 

Please help us to spread the word by:

 

Jenna-Lea Philpott, Founding Trustee
Craft Aotearoa Charitable Trust
Phone: 022 615 3669
Email: jenna-lea.philpott@craftaotearoa.org.nz
http://craftaotearoa.blogspot.com
www.facebook.com/CraftAotearoa

 

 

Written by

Jenna-Lea Philpott

22 Jun 2012

Interests Founding Trustee of Craft Aotearoa Charitable Trust. http://craftaotearoa.blogspot.com