David Rickard | echoes from the sound barrier

X, c-type photograph, 2018
A Walk in the Alps (Axis Mundi), work in progress, 2019
28 Nov 2019 to 2 Feb 2020
Daily 10am - 4pm, late night Wednesdays till 7pm
Ashburton-born David Rickard returns to home for a new solo exhibition.
Event type: 
Art
Price: 
Free
Venue: 
Ashburton Art Gallery
Address: 
327 West Street Ashburton
Region: 
Canterbury

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David, (1975) was born in Ashburton and attended Ashburton College before studying Architecture at Auckland School of Architecture and later Fine Arts in Milan and London. Now based in London, his original studies in architecture have had a lasting impact on his art practice, embedding questions of material and spatial perception deep into his work.

Echoes from the Sound Barrier will bring together new works made during 2018 and 2019, including a number of new pieces made in New Zealand specifically for this exhibition. The name references a latitudinal line 42.27 degrees south, which cuts across the South Island just below Kaikoura to around Greymouth. At this latitude the surface of the earth is revolving at precisely 1,235km/h, which is equal to the speed of sound.

All of the works consider movements and relationships that are typically imperceptible – from geographic relationships that span antipodes, to the constant revolution of the earth, the unrelenting drag of gravity and the weight of air. 

In one work, A roomful of air, David will explore the weight of air in the gallery with concrete construction blocks. Based on the Ashburton Art Gallery’s room dimensions and average room temperature, he estimates this to be 788kg of air. A calculation which he plans to fully determine during installation in late-November.

David’s work has been published in articles and interviews within The New York Times, The Independent, Frame, Kunstbeeld, Drome and Flash Art among others. His exhibition history spans solo exhibitions in Milan, London, Basel, Rotterdam and Brussels.

Written by

Ashburton Art Gallery

1 Nov 2019

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