Tributes: Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa

Leading Maori weaver Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa (Ngati Maniapoto, Ngati Kinohaku) was one o

Share

Arts Culture and Heritage Minister Christopher Finlayson expressed his sorrow at the death of renowned weaver Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa.

Arts Culture and Heritage Minister Christopher Finlayson expressed his sorrow at the death of renowned weaver Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa.

“Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa dedicated her life to promote and preserve the traditional art of weaving,” Mr Finlayson said. “She provided inspiration for many weavers and contemporary artists by sharing her knowledge, and was instrumental in the Renaissance of this art form.”

“My sincere condolences go to her family,” Mr Finlayson said.

Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa was awarded a CNZM. (Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit) in the 2000 New Year honours.

She received many awards, including Te Waka Toi (Maori Art Board of Creative New Zealand’s) premiere award, Te Tohu Tiketike o Te Waka Toi for a Lifetime Commitment to Maori Weaving in 2006.

She was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Waikato for her dedication to keeping alive the traditions of fine weaving.

Creative New Zealand mourns the loss of leading Maori artist

Creative New Zealand mourns the loss of leading Maori weaver Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa (Ngati Maniapoto, Ngati Kinohaku).  Diggeress was one of the key figures in the renaissance of the Maori weaving movement, co-founding the Aotearoa Moananui-a-Kiwa Weavers Association in 1983. Internationally renowned and respected for her skill and artistry, it was her generosity to share her knowledge which has created the greatest legacy.

Creative New Zealand Chief Executive Stephen Wainwright said Diggeress Te Kanawa’s contribution to mahi harakeke has had a profound impact on Maori arts. “As early as the 1950s Diggeress was working alongside her mother, Dame Rangimarie Hetet teaching weaving to those who showed an interest. Her sharing and educating in the art of weaving has made Maori arts stronger and the nation culturally wealthier.”

In 2001 Te Waka Toi, the Maori arts board of Creative New Zealand, awarded the Sir Kingi Ihaka Award to Diggeress for her contribution to Maori art.  The award acknowledged the work of Diggeress Te Kanawa in her commitment to the protection, preservation, reclamation and advancement of M?tauranga Maori in mahi harakeke. In 2006 Te Waka Toi honoured Diggeress again with their most prestigious award, Te Tohutiketike a Te Waka Toi which honours the lifetime achievement of the recipient.

The ceremony to honour Diggeress with Te Tohutiketike a Te Waka Toi at Tokanganui-a-noho marae in October 2006 was an opportunity to see the artist in the context of her home marae surrounded by the people who were key to the artist’s life said Stephen Wainwright.

“Diggeress Te Kanawa was an amazing woman whose strength and commitment to the arts was central to her family and community. Her influence, which extends nationally and internationally, will be felt for years to come through the many people who were fortunate enough to be taught by her and by those who have experienced her exhibited work.”

Post a tribute: Use the comment box below.

Written by

The Big Idea Editor

31 Jul 2009

The Big Idea Editor

Moss Patterson, photo supplied.
Story
Moss Patterson doesn't have time to waste.
Ani-Piki Tuari and Annette Morehu. Photo via Facebook
Story
Shortland Street storyliner and playwright Annette Morehu discovers the racial powers of narrative.
He Kupu Tuku Iho: Ko te Reo Māori te Tatau ki te Ao
Story
Sam Elworthy: There is a whirlpool from which we somehow need to escape.
Story
Matariki was a time when people would gather to share kai, rituals, entertainment, hospitality and learnings.