Speed chess maestro of Ngati Porou stars in independent documentary

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Dark Horse is an admiring portrait of Genesis Potini, Gisborne's speed-chess maestro who specialises in one-minute games, running opponents up against the clock, often trash-talking his way to…

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Dark Horse is an admiring portrait of Genesis Potini, Gisborne's speed-chess maestro who specialises in one-minute games, running opponents up against the clock, often trash-talking his way to victory.

Auckland filmmaker Jim Marbrook's independent documentary Dark Horsewill premiere at the 27th International Film Festival at Napier Century Cinema, Sunday 7 September, 1:15pm. Dark Horse is an admiring portrait of Genesis Potini, Gisborne's speed-chess maestro who specialises in one-minute games, running opponents up against the clock, often trash-talking his way to victory.

Auckland filmmaker Jim Marbrook's independent documentary Dark Horsewill premiere at the 27th International Film Festival at Napier Century Cinema, Sunday 7 September, 1:15pm.Dark Horse is an admiring portrait of Genesis Potini, Gisborne's speed chess maestro. Genesis specialises in one-minute games, running opponents up against the clock, often trash-talking his way to victory. But he is also a formidable communicator, a teacher, a chess coach and an upfront advocate for Mental Health consumers, he himself having to manage his own mental illness of bipolar disorder.

In 2001 Jim Marbrook began filming Genesis and the Eastern Knights, the club he formed with two friends to promote chess to not only to reflect their own Ngati Porou heritage but also to promote chess as a non-elitist pursuit, something open to everyone. They charged members one cent per week to play and then set about getting funding to keep the club going.

Dark Horse follows Genesis and his crew as they go up against New Zealand's best - and as Genesis himself deals with his own mental illness and a few further curve balls that life has thrown his way.

For director Jim Marbrook this is more than a story of chess and mental illness: "I believe that Genesis is a unique New Zealander. I started filming his life because I wanted others to see him, to hear his views and to reflect upon his own particular philosophy, a mixture of scripture and the street."

New Zealand Film Festival Director Bill Gosden adds "Dark Horse reached us too late for inclusion in this year's Auckland and Wellington Film Festivals, but it would have been a sure thing. It's a rich and rounded celebration of a remarkable individual and we're delighted to be able to provide a premiere venue for the full-version of the film in Napier's Festival."

Dark Horse will also feature at the International Film Festival in Gisborne.

Dark Horse, Century Cinema, Sunday 7 September, 1:15pm

70 mins Beta SP
Produced, Directed and Shot by Jim Marbrook
Edited by Jim Marbrook and Gregor Boyd
Original Music by Peter Daube
Additional Sound: Mike Wrathall and Paula Beverstock

About the Filmmaker:
Jim Marbrook is a television and film director. He trained at Concordia University Film School in Montreal where he made his first prize winning short film Little Jams. His first New Zealand short was Jumbo premiered at the NZ Film Festivals in 1998 and appeared at festivals all over the world and won a prize for its cinematography at the 1999 NZ Film Awards. Jim's most recent television work has been as a director on Mercury Lane. Dark Horse is his first feature length project.
www.darkhorsethefilm.com

Written by

The Big Idea Editor

6 Sep 2003

The Big Idea Editor

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